JMIR Nursing

Virtualizing care from hospital to community: Mobile health, telehealth, and digital patient care

Editor-in-Chief:

Elizabeth Borycki RN, PhD, FIAHIS, FACMI, FCAHS


JMIR Nursing (JN, Editor-in-Chief: Elizabeth Borycki, RN PhD, FIAHIS, FACMI, FCAHS) is a peer-reviewed journal for nursing in the 21st century. The focus of this journal is original research related to the paradigm change in nursing due to information technology and the shift towards preventative, predictive, personal medicine:

"In the 21st century the whole foundations of health care are being shaken. Technology is taking service to new heights of portability: less invasive, short-term, and with greater impact on both the length and quality of life. (...)

Time-based nursing care with the activities of bathing, treating, changing, feeding, intervening, drugging, and discharging are quickly becoming historic references to an age of practice that no longer exists. Now the challenge for nursing practice skills relates more to taking on the activities of accessing, informing, guiding, teaching, counseling, typing, and linking. "

(Tim Porter-O'Brady, Nurs Outlook 2001;49:182-6)

All papers are rigorously peer-reviewed, copyedited, and XML-typeset. JMIR Nursing is indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central, DOAJ, and CINAHL.

Recent Articles

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Nursing in a Hospital Setting

Emergency departments use triage to ensure that patients with the highest level of acuity receive care quickly and safely. Triage is typically a nursing process that is documented as structured and unstructured (free text) data. Free-text triage narratives have been studied for specific conditions but never reviewed in a comprehensive manner.

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Nursing in a Homecare Setting

Regular blood testing is an integral part of systemic anticancer therapy delivery. Blood tests are required before every administration of treatment to ensure that a patient is sufficiently well to receive it. Blood testing is burdensome for patients as they require either an extra visit within 48 hours of planned administration of treatment or a significantly long visit if performed on the day of treatment. The additional time for appointments can have a significant impact on the quality of life of someone who is living with cancer. In the United Kingdom, the COVID-19 pandemic created unprecedented disruption to the delivery of cancer care. Face-to-face hospital visits were reduced, resulting in the need to develop more innovative ways of working to minimize treatment interruptions. This led to significant uptake of digital technologies, with new models of care rapidly deployed across the UK health service to meet these challenges.

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Theme Issue: Nursing and COVID-19

Worldwide, the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in profound loss of life among older adults living in long-term care (LTC) homes. As a pandemic response, LTC homes enforced infection control processes, including isolating older adults in their rooms, canceling therapeutic programs, and restricting family member visits. Social isolation negatively impacts older adults in LTC, which may result in increased rates of anxiety, depression, physical and cognitive decline, disorientation, fear, apathy, and premature death. Isolation of older adults can also cause an increase in responsive behaviors (eg, yelling, hitting, calling out) to express frustration, fear, restricted movement, and boredom. To respond to the challenges in LTC and support frontline staff, older adults, and family members, a novel registered practical nurse (RPN)-led delivery of the PIECES approach for addressing responsive behaviors among older adults with dementia using virtual training/mentoring was implemented in Canadian LTC homes. PIECES employs a person- and family/care partner–centered collaborative team-based approach to provide education and capacity-building for nurses; engages families as active participants in care; and embeds evidence-informed practices to provide person- and family-centered care to older adults with complex needs, including dementia.

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Nursing in a Hospital Setting

Taiwan has insufficient nursing resources due to the high turnover rate of health care providers. Therefore, reducing the heavy workload of these employees is essential. Herein, speech transcription, which has various potential clinical applications, was employed for the documentation of nursing records. The requirement of including only one speaker per transcription facilitated data collection and system development. Moreover, authorization from patients was unnecessary.

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Nursing Education and Training

Digital health literacy is the use of information and communication technology to support health and health care. Digital health literacy is becoming increasingly important as individuals continue to seek medical advice from various web-based sources, especially social media, during the pandemics such as COVID-19.

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Reviews in Nursing

The nursing role significantly changed following reforms in the nurse training process. Nowadays, nurses are increasingly trained to promote and improve the quality of clinical practice and to provide support in the assistance of patients and communities. Opportunities and threats are emerging as a consequence of the introduction of new disruptive technologies in public health, which requires the health care staff to develop new digital skills.

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Nursing in a Hospital Setting

Patient mobility is an evidenced-based physical activity intervention initiated during intensive care unit (ICU) admission and continued throughout hospitalization to maintain functional status, yet mobility is a complex intervention and not consistently implemented. Cognitive work analysis (CWA) is a useful human factors framework for understanding complex systems and can inform future technology design to optimize outcomes.

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Theme Issue: Nursing and COVID-19

In the master’s program of advanced practice nursing at a Norwegian university college, the learning activity reflection groups were converted into virtual reflection group (VRG) meetings during the COVID-19 pandemic. Regardless of the students’ clinical practices in different hospitals, they could participate in the same VRG meeting on the web together with the educator from the university college, and the clinical supervisors were invited to participate. The students were in the process of developing the core competence required in their role as advanced practice nurses (APNs), and they had increased responsibility in the implementation of the VRG meetings.

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Reviews in Nursing

The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the uptake of digital health innovations due to the availability of various technologies and the urgent health care need for treatment and prevention. Although numerous studies have investigated digital health adoption and the associated challenges and strategies during the pandemic, there is a lack of evidence on the impact on the nursing workforce.

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Nurses Supporting Self-Management of Chronic Diseases

Online support groups (OSGs) are distance-delivered, easily accessible health interventions offering emotional, informational, and experience-based support and companionship or network support for caregivers managing chronic mental and physical health conditions.

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Original Papers

Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is often recommended for patients with breast cancer with more aggressive tumor characteristics. As with all chemotherapies, they can cause substantially disturbing symptoms. Most patients receive their treatment as outpatients, which means that they must take responsibility for self-care and management of symptoms at home for a long period. Patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy may not receive sufficient support for management of treatment-related symptoms. For patients undergoing NACT, it has been concluded that information and supportive needs are not always met. In our previous study, the use of mobile health to support patients with breast cancer undergoing NACT reduced symptoms during treatment with the support of an interactive app. Therefore, it is important to investigate how patients experience their care and explore any specific contribution that the app may have brought in care.

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Theme Issue: Nursing and COVID-19

Reports on the impact of electronic medical record (EMR) systems on clinicians are mixed. Currently, nurses’ experiences of adopting a large-scale, multisite EMR system have not been investigated. Nurses are the largest health care workforce; therefore, the impact of EMR implementation must be investigated and understood to ensure that patient care quality, changes to nurses’ work, and nurses themselves are not negatively impacted.

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