JMIR Nursing

Virtualizing care from hospital to community: Mobile health, telehealth, and digital patient care

Editor-in-Chief:

Elizabeth Borycki RN, PhD, FIAHIS, FACMI, FCAHS


JMIR Nursing (JN, Editor-in-Chief: Elizabeth Borycki, RN PhD, FIAHIS, FACMI, FCAHS) is a peer-reviewed journal for nursing in the 21st century. The focus of this journal is original research related to the paradigm change in nursing due to information technology and the shift towards preventative, predictive, personal medicine:

"In the 21st century the whole foundations of health care are being shaken. Technology is taking service to new heights of portability: less invasive, short-term, and with greater impact on both the length and quality of life. (...)

Time-based nursing care with the activities of bathing, treating, changing, feeding, intervening, drugging, and discharging are quickly becoming historic references to an age of practice that no longer exists. Now the challenge for nursing practice skills relates more to taking on the activities of accessing, informing, guiding, teaching, counseling, typing, and linking. "

(Tim Porter-O'Brady, Nurs Outlook 2001;49:182-6)

All papers are rigorously peer-reviewed, copyedited, and XML-typeset, ready for submission to PubMed Central/PubMed.

Recent Articles

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Nursing Education and Training

When this study began in 2018, I sought to determine the extent to which the top 50 schools of nursing were using hashtags that could attract attention from journalists on Twitter. In December 2020, the timeframe was expanded to encompass 2 more years of data, and an analysis was conducted of the types of hashtags used.

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Nursing in a Hospital Setting

Clinical alarm system safety is a national patient safety goal in the United States. Physiologic monitors are associated with the highest number of device alarms and alarm-related deaths. However, research involving nurses’ use of physiologic monitors is rare. Hence, the identification of critical usability issues for monitors, especially those related to patient safety, is a nursing imperative.

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Nursing Education and Training

It is predicted that artificial intelligence (AI) will transform nursing across all domains of nursing practice, including administration, clinical care, education, policy, and research. Increasingly, researchers are exploring the potential influences of AI health technologies (AIHTs) on nursing in general and on nursing education more specifically. However, little emphasis has been placed on synthesizing this body of literature.

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New Models of Care Involving Nurses

Artificial intelligence (AI) is set to transform the health system, yet little research to date has explored its influence on nurses—the largest group of health professionals. Furthermore, there has been little discussion on how AI will influence the experience of person-centered compassionate care for patients, families, and caregivers.

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New Models of Care Involving Nurses

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many health care organizations have adopted telehealth. The current literature on transitioning to telehealth has mostly been from large health care or specialty care organizations, with limited data from safety net or community clinics.

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Nursing Education and Training

Previous studies have proven that web-based learning media that offer interesting features with the learning management system concept could support the learning processes of nursing students. Nonetheless, it is still necessary to conduct further research on its potential as an information media that supports learning using 1 of the mobile learning methods.

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Patient Education in Nursing

Patients with heart failure have low quality of life because of physical impairments and advanced clinical symptoms. One of the main goals of caring for patients with heart failure is to improve their quality of life.

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Relationship and Communication between Patients and Nurses

More than 90% of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers could be prevented by widespread uptake of the HPV vaccine, yet vaccine use in the United States falls short of public health goals.

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New Models of Care Involving Nurses

Coordinated care and telehealth services have the potential to deliver quality care to chronically ill patients. They can both reduce the economic burden of chronic care and maximize the delivery of clinical services. Such services require new behaviors, routines, and ways of working to improve health outcomes, administrative efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and user (patient and health professional) experience.

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New Models of Care Involving Nurses

Telemonitoring (TM) interventions have been designed to support care delivery and engage patients in their care at home, but little research exists on TM of complex chronic conditions (CCCs). Given the growing prevalence of complex patients, an evaluation of multi-condition TM is needed to expand TM interventions and tailor opportunities to manage complex chronic care needs.

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Relationship and Communication between Patients and Nurses

Long-term care (LTC) homes provide 24-hour care for people living with complex care needs. LTC staff assist older adults living with chronic conditions such as Alzheimer disease, related dementias, and stroke, which can cause communication disorders. In addition to the complex cognitive challenges that can impact communication, further difficulties can arise from cultural-language differences between care staff and residents. Breakdowns in caregiver-resident communication can negatively impact the delivery of person-centered care. Recent advances in mobile technology, specifically mobile devices (tablets and smartphones) and their software apps, offer innovative solutions for supporting everyday communication between care staff and residents. To date, little is known about the care staff’s perspectives on the different ways that mobile technology could be used to support communication with residents.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

There are no preprints available for open peer-review at this time. Please check back later.

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